tates where chief prosecutors are appointed or are members of the state attorney general’s office

by Mr. Frederic McClure PhD 6 min read

How are attorneys general elected?

53 rows · Feb 24, 2003 · By: George Coppolo, Chief Attorney You asked how many states elect their chief prosecutors. ...

How many states elect and appoint their chief prosecutors?

Apr 06, 2020 · All of the following are states where chief prosecutors are appointed or are members of the state attorney general’s office EXCEPT: a. New Jersey. b. Connecticut. c. Rhode Island. d. California.

What states have a governor who appoints the Attorney General?

Aug 17, 2019 · All of the following are states where chief prosecutors are appointed or are members of the state attorney general's office EXCEPT: asked Feb 24, 2019 in Criminal Justice by Carl_Craig core-introductory

What is the Office of the Chief State's Attorney?

The US attorneys serve as the nation's principle litigators under the direction of the attorney general. One U.S. attorney is assigned to each of the judicial districts, with the exception of Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands, where one serves both districts. Each US attorney is the chief federal law enforcement officer of the United States ...

What percentage of chief prosecutors are locally elected?

26 The Attorney General is the chief prosecutor for the entire nation and the U.S. Attorneys are the chief prosecutors for each federal district. The Attorney General oversees each U.S. Attorney and the United States Department of Justice. 27 More than 95 percent of county and municipal chief prosecutors are elected.

How is the chief local prosecuting attorney elected?

Depending on the state, an elected prosecutor may go by titles like “District Attorney,” “State Attorney,” “Prosecuting Attorney” or “County Attorney.” They are elected to 4-year terms by the voters in the county or local district that they serve.

Who are the US attorneys appointed by quizlet?

The United States Attorney is appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate for a term of four years. In smaller offices, they may be responsible for all aspects of criminal prosecution.

How are prosecutors elected in Connecticut?

All state prosecutors in Connecticut are appointed by the Criminal Justice Commission. The commission was established when the voters of Connecticut approved the 23rd Amendment to the State Constitution in 1984.

Are local prosecutors appointed?

Most of those 45 states elect their prosecutors for four-year terms with no term limits in partisan elections. Only four states follow the federal government in appointing rather than electing their local prosecutors. Alaska, Connecticut, Delaware, and New Jersey appoint their local prosecutors.

Are prosecutors elected in us?

Prosecutors are most often chosen through local elections, and typically hire other attorneys as deputies or assistants to conduct most of the actual work of the office. United States Attorneys are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

Who appoints the US attorney general?

the president of the United StatesThe attorney general is a statutory member of the Cabinet of the United States. Under the Appointments Clause of the United States Constitution, the officeholder is nominated by the president of the United States, then appointed with the advice and consent of the United States Senate.

How are US attorneys appointed?

The U.S. attorney is appointed by the President of the United States for a term of four years, with appointments subject to confirmation by the Senate. A U.S. attorney continues in office, beyond the appointed term, until a successor is appointed and qualified.

Who is the prosecutors client quizlet?

Prosecutors often define their jobs as representing victims of crime and the police, but these are not typically considered to fit under the attorney-client relationship. Rather, the client of the prosecutor is the government and for this reason prosecutors are given special responsibilities.

What are prosecutors called Connecticut?

And finally, the Chief State's Attorney, like all “state's attorneys” in Connecticut, is a prosecutor, someone who represents the state in criminal cases. In other states, prosecutors are usually called “district attorneys,” or “DA's.”Oct 21, 2019

Who is the District Attorney for Connecticut?

United States Attorneys for The District of Connecticut1Pierpont Edwards1789 - 180651Deirdre M. Daly2013 - 201752John H. Durham2017-202153Leonard C Boyle202149 more rows•Jan 4, 2022

What is the meaning of Chief State Attorney?

In addition to budget, personnel and other administrative functions, the Office of the Chief State's Attorney includes specialized units for the investigation and prosecution of certain criminal matters and for representing the state in appellate and other legal matters.

What is the office of the Chief State Attorney?

Located in Rocky Hill, Connecticut, the Office of the Chief State's Attorney is responsible for the statewide administrative functions of the Division of Criminal Justice. In addition to budget, personnel and other administrative functions, the Office of the Chief State's Attorney includes specialized units for the investigation and prosecution of certain criminal matters and for representing the state in appellate and other legal matters.

What is the statewide prosecution bureau?

The Statewide Prosecution Bureau is responsible for the investigation and prosecution of "white collar" crimes, including government corruption. Program areas include criminal violations of the environmental protection laws, government corruption and other offenses against public integrity. The bureau includes the Cold Case Unit, which is responsible for the investigation and prosecution of serious crimes that have gone "cold," or unsolved for a long period of time. The cases assigned to this Unit typically include unsolved murders, some of which took place decades ago. The Unit works closely with the State's Attorneys, the Connecticut State Police, municipal police departments, and nationally recognized forensics experts, utilizing the latest technology to solve these crimes.

What is the Division of Criminal Justice?

The Division of Criminal Justice is responsible for the prosecution of criminal housing matters through the Supervisory Assistant State's Attorney for Housing Matters in the Office of the Chief State's Attorney and prosecutors assigned to the Superior Court housing sessions statewide. Housing prosecutors are committed to the maintenance of decent, safe and sanitary housing, handling cases from investigation through criminal trial.

What is the Appellate Bureau?

The Appellate Bureau is responsible for representing the State of Connecticut in the vast majority of appeals challenging criminal convictions. This bureau, which employs approximately twenty-five prosecutors, prepares written legal arguments (briefs) and presentations (oral argument) before the Connecticut Supreme Court and the Connecticut Appellate Court.

Who is the Chief State Attorney of Connecticut?

Richard J. Colangelo, J r. was sworn in as Chief State's Attorney on January 31, 2020. As Chief State's Attorney, he is the chief law enforcement officer of the State of Connecticut and administrative head of the Division of Criminal Justice, the independent agency in the executive branch of state government that is responsible for ...

What is the Civil Litigation Bureau?

The Civil Litigation Bureau is primarily responsible for state and federal habeas corpus actions in which a convict challenges the lawfulness of his or her criminal conviction in a civil court action. The Civil Litigation Bureau also is responsible for responding to civil subpoenas of investigative and other records of the Division of Criminal Justice or seeking injunctive or declaratory relief.

What is the role of a prosecutor?

Prosecutors often define their jobs as representing victims of crime and the police, but these are not typically considered to fit under the attorney-client relationship. Rather, the client of the prosecutor is the government and for this reason prosecutors are given special responsibilities.

Does the government have a reasonable legal argument?

the government has a reasonable legal argument. When they first began working as prosecutors, rookie assistant attorneys learn important unwritten rules, legal practices, and appropriate penalties: By asking question of experienced prosecutors, court clerks, and police officers.

Which states have elected an attorney general in 2015?

Three states held elections for attorney general in 2015: Kentucky, Louisiana and Mississippi. In Kentucky, Andy Beshear (D) won election to the attorney general seat. Democrat Jim Hood was re-elected in Mississippi, while Republican Jeff Landry defeated incumbent Buddy Caldwell, also a Republican, in a runoff in Louisiana.

How many states have an attorney general?

The attorney general is directly elected in 43 states and Washington, D.C. The attorney general is appointed by the state Legislature in Maine, by the state Supreme Court in Tennessee, and by the governor in the remaining five states. Compensation of state attorneys general (2017)

How many territories are there in the US?

Comparison across states. Although Ballotpedia covers the five U.S. territories. The five U.S. territories are American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, Puerto Rico, and the United States Virgin Islands. and their officeholders, territory officeholders are not included in the following figures.

What is the job of the Attorney General?

The attorney general is an executive office in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., that serves as the chief legal advisor and chief law enforcement officer for the state government and is empowered to prosecute violations of state law, represent the state in legal disputes and issue legal advice to state agencies and the legislature.

How many states have the power to appeal a criminal case?

Attorneys general: Power to represent state in criminal appeals. The attorney general has the power to represent the state in criminal appeals in 46 states, although this power is restricted in five of those states. Attorney general term limits. Attorney general term limits.

How many states were elected in 2012?

2012. Ten states held attorney general elections in the 2012 electoral cycle: Indiana, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Utah, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia . Heading into the November election, the Democrats held six of the seats and the Republicans held four seats.

Who appointed Ellen Rosenblum as the Attorney General?

Gov. John Kitzhaber appointed Ellen Rosenblum, who was running for 2012 election to the attorney general post at the time, to serve as interim attorney general for the remainder of his unexpired term. Rosenblum was elected to a full term in the general election on November 6, 2012.

How are Attorney Generals chosen?

Attorneys general are chosen in four different ways; they are either popularly elected or appointed by the governor, the state legislature, or the state supreme court. The office is elective in 43 states and chosen by a state government organ in seven.

How many states elect their Attorney General?

Forty-three states publicly elect their attorneys general, reinforcing the office's relationship with, and direct accountability to, the people, in contrast with the Kings Attorneys of the past, whose singular service to their version of governors must have left those being governed wanting.

What are the criticisms of the Attorney General?

Among the chief criticisms of the office is that state attorneys general have strayed from their traditional defense-based lawyer role to assume a more proactive and political posture, often in ways that overstep the legal authority of the office and/or what would be historically recognized as the limits of institutional etiquette. In some cases, attorneys general look inward to test the bounds of their authority through involvement in state legislative matters, or by refusing to uphold state laws which they find to be in violation of an alternate, overarching ideological code, such as Pennsylvania AG Kathleen Kane 's stated refusal to enforce Pennsylvania's ban on same-sex marriage. Other times, AGs turn outward to reinterpret their function: In recent years, a number of cases have arisen where state attorneys general mounted coordinated efforts to challenge laws passed by the United States Congress or to exert influence over the outcome of pending federal legislation. The most prominent of these cases is the State Attorneys General Against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, which saw 26 Republican AGs team up to instigate a lawsuit against the federal government following Congress' passage of President Obama's health care reform bill.

How much did 49 AGs settle for?

For instance, the nationwide mortgage crisis that led 49 AGs ( Oklahoma 's Scott Pruitt made an independent deal for his state) to negotiate and ultimately settle for $26 billion with a handful of large U.S. banks over dodgy home foreclosures in the wake of the 2008 market downturn.

How many states have a state resident requirement for an attorney general?

1, Oklahoma, sets the limit at 31. 1, Colorado, sets the limit at 27. 1, Mississippi, sets the limit at 26. State Citizen. 43 states have a formal provision stating an attorney general must be a state resident, while 7 do not have a formal provision. Of the 43 states, 24 specify the number of years and 19 do not.

What is the job of an attorney general?

The primary job of a state attorney general is to serve as chief legal adviser to the agencies and legislative organs that make up his or her state's government, in addition to the citizens residing within the state. It is this last common aspect of the role, ...

How many terms can a state attorney serve?

1, Montana, is limited to two terms (eight years) in any 16 year span. 1, Maine, can serve a maximum of four terms, each two years in length. 1, Tennessee, is appointed by the State Supreme Court to serve a term of eight years.

What is the role of the Attorney General?

The state attorney general in each of the 50 U.S. states, of the federal district, or of any of the territories is the chief legal advisor to the state government and the state's chief law enforcement officer. In some states, the attorney general serves as the head of a state department of justice, with responsibilities similar to those of the United States Department of Justice .

How long does an attorney general serve?

Elected attorneys general serve a four-year term, except in Vermont, where the term is two years. Seven states do not popularly elect an attorney general. In Alaska, Hawaii, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Wyoming, the attorney general is a gubernatorial appointee. The attorney general in Tennessee is appointed by the Tennessee Supreme Court ...

How many terms can an attorney general serve in Puerto Rico?

Many states have passed term limits limiting the selection to 2 consecutive terms (9 states); 2 terms maximum (4 states), but 33 states still have no term limits.

Office of The Chief State's Attorney

  • Located in Rocky Hill, Connecticut, the Office of the Chief State's Attorneyis responsible for the statewide administrative functions of the Divisionof Criminal Justice. In addition to budget, personnel and other administrative functions, theOffice of the Chief State's Attorney includes specialized units for theinvestigation and prosecution of cert...
See more on portal.ct.gov

About The Acting Chief State's Attorney

  • John J. Russotto was appointed Acting Chief State's Attorney by the Criminal Justice Commission on February 9, 2022. Attorney Russotto has served as Deputy Chief State's Attorney for Personnel, Finance and Administration for the Division of Criminal Justice, responsible for oversight of budgetary and other administrative functions for the agency and its more than 50 offices and ne…
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Specialized Units in The Office of The Chiefstate's Attorney

  • The Chief State's Attorney's Office operates the following specializedbureaus: Appellate Bureau Civil Litigation Bureau Criminal Housing Matters Medicaid Fraud Control Unit StatewideProsecution Bureau/Cold Case Unit/Witness Protection Unit The Statewide Prosecution Bureau is responsible for the investigation andprosecution of "white collar" crimes, including gov…
See more on portal.ct.gov