u.s. attorney general 2021

by Elfrieda Jast 8 min read

Who is the current Attorney General?

Attorney General Attorney General Merrick B. Garland was sworn in as the 86 th Attorney General of the United States on March 11, 2021. As the nation’s chief law enforcement officer, Attorney General Garland leads the Justice Department’s 115,000 employees, who work across the United States and in more than 50 countries worldwide.

What is the job of the US Attorney General?

Mar 10, 2021 · President Joe Biden named the longtime federal appeals court judge and onetime Supreme Court pick to lead an agency central to his domestic policy agenda. The vote was 70-30. Attorney General...

Who is the Deputy Attorney General in the US?

There was one attorney general seat on the ballot in 2021. This election was in Virginia, where Jason Miyares (R) defeated incumbent Mark Herring (D). This changed the partisan balance of state attorneys general from 24 Democratic and 26 Republican officeholders to 23 Democratic and 27 Republican officeholders.

How many Attorney General in US?

protect the public funds and other assets of the United States; maintain a professional working environment; and. with skill and integrity, seek to achieve justice in every civil and criminal matter we handle. Si necesita ayuda en español, por favor comuniquese al telefono 702-388-6336.

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Who is the present U.S. Attorney General?

Merrick GarlandThe attorney general is a statutory member of the Cabinet of the United States....United States Attorney GeneralFlag of the United States Attorney GeneralIncumbent Merrick Garland since March 11, 2021United States Department of JusticeStyleMr. Attorney General (informal) The Honorable (formal)13 more rows

Who is the current U.S. deputy attorney general?

Lisa MonacoUnited States Deputy Attorney GeneralIncumbent Lisa Monaco since April 21, 2021United States Department of JusticeStyleMadam. Deputy Attorney GeneralReports toUnited States Attorney General7 more rows

How many attorney generals are there in the United States?

In the order of creation, the position of attorney general was the fourth cabinet level position created by Congress, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. Attorneys general may be impeached and removed from office by Congress. As of 2013 the office of U.S. Attorney General has been held by eighty two people.

Does the U.S. Attorney General represent the President?

The plural form is attorneys general. The U.S. Attorney General oversees the Department of Justice, represents the United States in litigation, and advises the President and heads of federal executive departments on legal matters.

How old is Lisa Monaco?

54 years (February 25, 1968)Lisa Monaco / Age

How many attorney generals are there in New York?

A chronological list of past New York attorneys general is below....New York Former Attorneys General.Barbara Underwood (Acting)2018Eric Schneiderman2011 – 2018Andrew M. Cuomo2007 – 2010Eliot Spitzer1999 – 2006Dennis Vacco1995 – 199859 more rows

Who is the highest law officer?

Advocate General of the State is the highest law officer in the state. The Constitution of India (Article 165) has provided for the office of the Advocate General for the states.

Who was the 1980s Attorney General?

A chronological list of past California attorneys general is below....California Former Attorneys General.Matthew Rodriguez2021 – 2021John K. Van de Kamp1983 – 1991George Deukemejian1979 – 1983Evelle J. Younger1971 – 1979Thomas C. Lynch1964 – 197129 more rows

Who was the first female Attorney General of the United States?

Janet RenoOfficial portrait, c. 1990s78th United States Attorney GeneralIn office March 12, 1993 – January 20, 2001PresidentBill Clinton16 more rows

What do attorney generals do?

The U.S Attorney General represents the United States in legal matters and offers advice and opinions to the president and to the heads of the executive departments of the government if needed. The current U.S Attorney General position is held by Jeff Sessions, an American politician and lawyer.Apr 24, 2017

What is the purpose of the U.S. Attorney General?

The principal duties of the Attorney General are to: Represent the United States in legal matters. Supervise and direct the administration and operation of the offices, boards, divisions, and bureaus that comprise the Department.Oct 8, 2021

What are the powers of Attorney General?

(1) He gives advice to the Government of India upon such legal matters, which are referred or assigned to him by the president. (2) He performs such other duties of a legal character that are referred or assigned to him by the president.Mar 30, 2019

When does the Attorney General have to resign?

Presidential transition[edit] It is the practice for the attorney general, along with the other Cabinet secretaries and high-level political appointees of the President, to tender a resignation with effect on the Inauguration Day(January 20) of a new president.

What is the job of the Attorney General?

The attorney general serves as the principal advisor to the president of the United Stateson all legal matters. The attorney general is a statutory member of the Cabinet of the United States.

Who was the attorney general nominee for Clinton?

Gerson was fourth in the line of succession at the Justice Department, but other senior DOJ officials had already resigned.[14] Janet Reno, President Clinton's nominee for attorney general, was confirmed on March 12,[15]and he resigned the same day.

Is "general" a noun?

The title "attorney general" is an example of a noun (attorney) followed by a postpositive adjective(general).[8]". General" is a description of the type of attorney, not a title or rank in itself (as it would be in the military).[8]

When was Garland appointed Attorney General?

Nomination and confirmation. Garland is sworn in as Attorney General in March 2021. President-elect Joe Biden selected Garland for the position of United States attorney general, with news of the selection coming on January 6, 2021. He was formally nominated by Biden on January 20, after Biden took office.

Who was appointed to the Supreme Court by Obama?

President Barack Obama, a Democrat, nominated Garland to serve as an associate justice of the Supreme Court in March 2016 to fill the vacancy created by the death of Antonin Scalia. However, the Republican Senate majority refused to hold a hearing or vote on his nomination.

What cases did Garland disagree with?

While on the bench, Garland has shown a tendency to be deferential to the government in criminal cases, siding with prosecutors in ten of the fourteen criminal cases in which he disagreed with a colleague. For example, in United States v. Watson (1999), Garland dissented when the court concluded a prosecutor's closing argument was unduly prejudicial, objecting that a conviction should be reversed for only "the most egregious of these kind of errors." In 2007, Garland dissented when the en banc D.C. Circuit reversed the conviction of a Washington, D.C. police officer who had accepted bribes in an FBI sting operation.

What did Garland write about?

At Harvard, Garland wrote news articles and theater reviews for the Harvard Crimson and worked as a Quincy House tutor. Garland wrote his 235-page honors thesis on industrial mergers in Britain in the 1960s.

Where was Merrick Garland born?

Early life and education. Merrick Brian Garland was born on November 13, 1952, in Chicago. He grew up in the northern Chicago suburb of Lincolnwood. His mother Shirley ( née Horwitz) was a director of volunteer services at Chicago 's Council for Jewish Elderly (now called CJE SeniorLife).

How long did Garland's nomination last?

Garland's nomination lasted 293 days (the longest to date by far), and it expired on January 3, 2017, at the end of the 114th Congress. Eventually, President Donald Trump, a Republican, nominated and appointed Neil Gorsuch to the vacant seat. In March 2021, President Joe Biden appointed Garland as Attorney General.

What was McConnell's refusal to hold hearings on Garland's nomination?

McConnell's categorical refusal to hold hearings on Garland's nomination was described by political scientists and legal scholars as unprecedented, McConnell's choice to lead a Republican blockade of the nomination was described as a "culmination of [his] confrontational style," and an example of constitutional hardball.

Who was the attorney general before Biden?

Before Biden tapped Garland to be attorney general, the centrist lawyer was nominated by former President Barack Obama to a seat on the Supreme Court in 2016 to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia.

Who is the head of the Department of Justice?

Garland takes over as the head of the Department of Justice as the sprawling agency continues to investigate the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, one of the largest probes in its history. Garland has called the inquiry his No. 1 priority.

What is Garland's first priority?

AG nominee Garland says his first priority would be to prosecute Capitol rioters. The News with Shepard Smith. “I would not have taken this job if I thought that politics would have any influence over prosecutions and investigations,” Garland told lawmakers at his hearing.

Did Biden and Garland discuss the tax affairs of Hunter Biden?

He said that he and Biden had not discussed an ongoing investigation into the tax affairs of Hunter Biden, the president’s son. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., cheered Garland’s nomination ahead of the vote on Wednesday.

What is the attorney general's job in Virginia in 2021?

2022 →. There is one attorney general seat on the ballot in 2021. This election is in Virginia . As the state's chief legal officer, the attorney general is responsible for enforcing state law and advising the state government on legal matters.

How many states have an attorney general?

The attorney general is directly elected in 43 states and Washington, D.C. The attorney general is appointed by the state Legislature in Maine, by the state Supreme Court in Tennessee, and by the governor in the remaining five states.

How many attorneys generals did the Republican Party win in 2010?

In the 2010 midterm elections, the Republican Party gained a lead in elected attorney general offices, with 22 elected attorneys general to the Democrats' 21. The Democratic victory in the 2013 Virginia election for attorney general caused the party to briefly regain a 22-21 majority of elected attorney general offices.

What is the job of the Attorney General?

The attorney general is an executive office in all 50 states and Washington, D.C., that serves as the chief legal advisor and chief law enforcement officer for the state government and is empowered to prosecute violations of state law, represent the state in legal disputes and issue legal advice to state agencies and the legislature.

How many terms has the Attorney General of Virginia served?

A Virginia attorney general has not served three consecutive terms since 1945 when Abram Penn Staples (D) was elected for the third time. The Attorney General of Virginia is a publicly elected executive official in the Virginia state government. The attorney general provides legal advice and representation for all state agencies.

How many states have the power to take over a case handled by a local prosecutor?

In some cases. In all cases. N/A. In 36 states, the attorney general has the power to take over a case handled by a local prosecutor without instructions from the governor or legislature, although this power is restricted to certain cases in 22 of those states.

How many states will have a judicial election in 2021?

In 2021, six states are holding elections for executive, legislative, or judicial seats, including elections for three of the nation's 99 state legislative chambers, 15 appellate court seats, and two gubernatorial offices.

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Overview

History

Congress passed the Judiciary Act of 1789 which, among other things, established the Office of the Attorney General. The original duties of this officer were "to prosecute and conduct all suits in the Supreme Court in which the United States shall be concerned, and to give his advice and opinion upon questions of law when required by the president of the United States, or when requested by the heads of any of the departments". Some of these duties have since been transferred to the U…

Presidential transition

It is the practice for the attorney general, along with the other Cabinet secretaries and high-level political appointees of the President, to tender a resignation with effect on the Inauguration Day (January 20) of a new president. The deputy attorney general is also expected to tender a resignation, but is commonly requested to stay on and act as the attorney general pending the confirmation by the Senate of the new attorney general.

Line of succession

U.S.C. Title 28, §508 establishes the first two positions in the line of succession, while allowing the attorney general to designate other high-ranking officers of the Department of Justice as subsequent successors. Furthermore, an Executive Order defines subsequent positions, the most recent from March 31, 2017, signed by President Donald Trump. The current line of succession is:
1. United States Deputy Attorney General

See also

• Executive Order 13787 for "Providing an Order of Succession Within the Department of Justice"

Overview

Merrick Brian Garland (born November 13, 1952) is an American lawyer and jurist serving as the 86th United States attorney general since March 2021. He served as a circuit judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit from 1997 to 2021.
A native of the Chicago area, Garland attended Harvard Universityfor his underg…

Attorney General (2021–present)

President-elect Joe Biden selected Garland for the position of United States attorney general, with news of the selection coming on January 6, 2021. He was formally nominated by Biden on January 20, after Biden took office. In Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearings, Garland vowed to oversee vigorous prosecution of those who stormed the United States Capitol, and other domest…

Early life and education

Merrick Brian Garland was born on November 13, 1952, in Chicago. He grew up in the northern Chicago suburb of Lincolnwood. His mother Shirley (née Horwitz; 1925–2016) was a director of volunteer services at Chicago's Council for Jewish Elderly (now called CJE SeniorLife). His father, Cyril Garland (1915–2000), headed Garland Advertising, a small business run out of the family home. Garland was raised in Conservative Judaism, the family name having been changed from …

Early career

After graduating from law school, Garland spent two years as a judicial law clerk, first for Judge Henry Friendly of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit from 1977 to 1978 and then for Justice William Brennan at the U.S. Supreme Court from 1978 to 1979. After his clerkships, Garland spent two years as a special assistant to U.S. Attorney General Benjamin Civiletti.
After the Carter administration ended in 1981, Garland entered private practice at the law firm Arn…

Federal judicial service (1997–2021)

Garland served as co-chair of the administrative law section of the District of Columbia Bar from 1991 to 1994. He is also a member of the American Law Institute.
In 2003, Garland was elected to the Harvard Board of Overseers, completing the unexpired term of Deval Patrick, who had stepped down from the board. Garlan…

Supreme Court nomination

Garland was considered twice to fill vacated seats on the United States Supreme Court in 2009 and 2010, before finally being nominated in 2016 by President Barack Obama for the seat left vacant by the death of conservative Associate Justice Antonin Scalia.
In 2009, following the announcement by Justice David Souterthat he would reti…

Personal life

Garland and his wife, Lynn, were married at the Harvard Club in Manhattan in September 1987. Lynn Rosenman Garland's grandfather, Samuel Irving Rosenman, was a justice of the New York Supreme Court (a trial-level court) and a special counsel to presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman. She graduated from the Brearley School in Manhattan and cum laude from Harvard University and received a Master of Science degree in operations management from the MIT Slo…

Selected publications

• Garland, Merrick B. (1985). "Deregulation and Judicial Review" (PDF). Harvard Law Review. 98 (3): 505–591. doi:10.2307/1340869. JSTOR 1340869.
• ——— (1987). "Antitrust and Federalism: A Response to Professor Wiley". The Yale Law Journal. 96 (6): 1291–1295. doi:10.2307/796386. JSTOR 796386.